NCM Regard for Officers; Army vs RCAF vs RCN

MilEME09

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SeaKingTacco said:
I disagree with your quote, because it is incomplete. In most units, NCOs are the repository of both corporate knowledge and technical expertise. So, it is not (narrowly) advising officers on issues affecting non-commissioned members (which sounds a bit like a shop steward) that is the really important bit, it is the other two.

In units that I have seen that seem to run like a swiss clock, the constant is a deep respect between officers and NCOs and easy, frank communication. It is not that NCOs always get their way: it is that they always feel that they were heard.

My fault for not providing context, in this case training is referring to learning not day to day operations. I agree the knowledge base is important as your NCOs are subject matter experts in their respective fields. The argument made by the book can be summed up by saying that as SME if someone isn't willing to listen to your knowledge and experience, they might not be worth investing your time in.
 

Furniture

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SeaKingTacco said:
In units that I have seen that seem to run like a swiss clock, the constant is a deep respect between officers and NCOs and easy, frank communication. It is not that NCOs always get their way: it is that they always feel that they were heard.

I agree 100% with this.

I think the issue comes from a small number of officers who think they know best, and a small number of NCOs who dislike being told no. Over the span of nearly 20 years I have had the displeasure of working for only  q few officers who were too self important to listen to anyone below them.

One even tried to explain to me how to use a Regional 4 panel chart to "forecast" the weather... Literally stood in front of the ships weather forecaster and tried to explain a chart he didn't understand.
 

dimsum

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Furniture said:
I agree 100% with this.

I think the issue comes from a small number of officers who think they know best, and a small number of NCOs who dislike being told no. Over the span of nearly 20 years I have had the displeasure of working for only  q few officers who were too self important to listen to anyone below them.

One even tried to explain to me how to use a Regional 4 panel chart to "forecast" the weather... Literally stood in front of the ships weather forecaster and tried to explain a chart he didn't understand.

I heard a story that one of the officers on a multi-crew aircraft which name rhymes with "Schurora" was trying to micromanage the sensors.  So, the sensor operators just left and went to the galley and had their meal. 
 

Furniture

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Dimsum said:
I heard a story that one of the officers on a multi-crew aircraft which name rhymes with "Schurora" was trying to micromanage the sensors.  So, the sensor operators just left and went to the galley and had their meal.

I'm sure the message was received lol.  ;D

In my case I just started explaining what all the squiggly lines he was pointing at were called, and how they are used in forecasting... my message didn't get through.  :facepalm:
 

SeaKingTacco

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Furniture said:
I'm sure the message was received lol.  ;D

In my case I just started explaining what all the squiggly lines he was pointing at were called, and how they are used in forecasting... my message didn't get through.  :facepalm:

Isobars?

Not just another pretty face...  ;D
 

Kat Stevens

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I was an AVLB operator for a looong time, and had a rep as being the fastest bridge in the west, within the limits of the machine. We were doing our umpteenth combat team attack of the ex, rotating field troops, and therefore troop commanders, through the obstacle breaching portions. 1 and 2 troop TCs were more than happy with me telling them I needed four minutes from rolling up to the obstacle to me being out of the way and the crossing open. The 3 troop commander insisted I do it in three, despite being told it wasn't mechanically possible. At the commander's mud map meeting, which our crews attended as SMEs, the TC went through how the breach was to be conducted. He promised 9er three minutes to breach. He raised his eyebrow, looked at me and asked if that was accurate. I didn't want to throw the young guy under the bus, so shuffled my feet and hemmed and hawed a bit. Sadly the TC took it out of my hands by opening his mouth. That and a couple of other brain farts ensured he didn't stay in the regiment long.
 

Furniture

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SeaKingTacco said:
Isobars?

Not just another pretty face...  ;D

Indeed, at least on one of the four pannels. Apparently you did listen when I was briefing.  ;D
 

SeaKingTacco

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Furniture said:
Indeed, at least on one of the four pannels. Apparently you did listen when I was briefing.  ;D

Once in a while...my life depended on it!
 
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