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MARS Time at Sea

gillbates

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CDN Aviator said:
Sea pay is a fixed rate. If you are in a position in receipt of sea duty allowance, you get paid the prescribed rate regardless of the number of days actualy spent at sea.

I see. Thanks for clearing that up, CDN Aviator!
 

Neill McKay

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CDN Aviator said:
Sea pay is a fixed rate. If you are in a position in receipt of sea duty allowance, you get paid the prescribed rate regardless of the number of days actualy spent at sea.

But does the rate not increase in the long term, i.e. based on the number of years in a seagoing position?
 

Pat in Halifax

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Yes, SDA rates increase with time posted to a sea going unit. Maybe one of the RMS clerks on here could get the actual figures but I believe the levels are at 5, 9, 14 and 19 years. Keep in mind too that if you do anything in "hazardous" areas, though you lose SDA, you receive Hardship and HDA. I truly have no idea what those figures are and they have changed dramatically since I was in a position to receive them ('02).
 
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aesop081

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N. McKay said:
But does the rate not increase in the long term, i.e. based on the number of years in a seagoing position?

Yes, hence why i said "prescribed rate". This rate is not affected by the number of days you actualy spend at sea. For example, if you get $471 a month is SDA and usualy spend 5 days a month at sea, you still get $471 for a month where you spent 30 days at sea. If you are in a sea going position in receipt of SDA , asking for more days at sea will not get you more money.
 

Comahawk

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CDN Aviator said:
If 60-120 days at sea per year is too much, i'm currious as to what you expectations of being in the Navy were ?

As stated, the situation between when I joined and where I am now has drastically changed.
 
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aesop081

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Comahawk said:
As stated, the situation between when I joined and where I am now has drastically changed.

Most CF trades will see you gone 60-120 days per year so i think you have a bigger problem.
 

Torlyn

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Ex-Dragoon said:
There are quite a few MS and below that surpass that figure every year.

Sorry to drag up an old thread, but there's quite a few MARS guys that surpass that as well.  I've been sailing for 5 years now, and the lightest year I have was 163 days, and the heaviest (granted, a gulf trip) was 279.  We do get shopped out to other ships, and with the introduction of the ORCA class, we routinely get shopped out for 6 week stints on that platform during our "down" time.  GRanted, (so I've heard) the ratio improves as you complete D-levels, but during the early years, it can be seatime heavy.

For those joining, keep in mind we're entering the bathtub years right now.  You'll be begging for a chance to go to sea soon...

T
 

Pusser

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Comahawk said:
Thank you for the information Lex, it is nice to get someone with first hand experience to give a rough idea what the job is like. Given this information, I think I will be initiating a change to become a Log Officer, hopefully I can stay as a naval Log O at least.

If you're a Log O posted to a ship, you're at sea just as often as all the MARS officers on board.  Although, the number of sea postings that a LogO gets over the course of a career will be considerably fewer than those of MARS officers, if you concern is how much time you will be away from your family in a given year, the amount is the same.  The only difference is that LogOs generally get an absolute maximum of three sea tours (and not everybody gets those) in  a career, while MARS officers can expect five to eight.
 

Oldgateboatdriver

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First tour: After your Phase Four, leading to your Watchkeeping.

Second tour as specialist: Air Controler, Communications, Baby Deck O, Navo, etc.

Third Tour: Head of Department.

Fourth tour: Executive Officer/ senior Head of Dept. (Combat O)

Fifth tour: Executive Officer or Captain

Sixth tour: Captain/ Senior Captain (second time) / Squadron Commander

Seventh tour: Squadron Commander / Task Force Commander
 

Container

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Ive looked at CEOTP (I have like three courses left) for MARS a few times. And take this for what its worth- but if I was joining the Navy I would want to be at sea. Isnt that the allure?

Of course thats easy to say when I dont have to 'splain to the wife that Im leaving again.
 

MMSS

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Container said:
Ive looked at CEOTP (I have like three courses left) for MARS a few times. And take this for what its worth- but if I was joining the Navy I would want to be at sea. Isnt that the allure?

Of course thats easy to say when I dont have to 'splain to the wife that Im leaving again.

While I don't look forward to being away from my wife and children, I have to agree. The Navy life is a life at sea.
 

Oldgateboatdriver

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Hate to say this but, you guys (and galls?) are complaining for nothing.

In the 70's and early 80's, cold war period before the wall fell, we averaged  220 to 230 days at sea per year with the old steamers - and that was with budget cut backs.
 

Halifax Tar

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Oldgateboatdriver said:
Hate to say this but, you guys (and galls?) are complaining for nothing.

In the 70's and early 80's, cold war period before the wall fell, we averaged  220 to 230 days at sea per year with the old steamers - and that was with budget cut backs.

Don't be mislead OGBD... The ships are so sparsely manned that although a certain hull may not log as many hours underway I can assure that the sailors in each mess are logging an extremely high amount of sea days each year... Keyword = Pier-head jumps!

While on the Toronto in '06-'09 we logged close to 250+ each year. At one point I remember our supply section underway with a CPO2, P1, P2, MS and 2 LS... (I was one of the LS). As well in the 2 "years" I have been posted ashore I sailed probably 150-200 days in those years! This all being said in that 3 year period we went through 3 Sup O's and 2 Baby Sup O's. So the turn over for them was quiet high!

On a side note upon my return from tour 2 of Afghanistan in Nov and while on my 3 half days work I was presented with two interesting scenarios:

1) Welcome back! Good to see you again! How would you like to join Charlottetown ? (Deploying another 6 months in the future)
2) We have in FLOG (Base Supply in Halifax) 2, count them 2, fit and able MS Sup Techs and guess what ? We both just returned from 15 months away from home with training and tour...

What a state we're in!

(PS Caught my error opps!) And edited
 
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