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All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)

Loachman

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Statistically speaking still, no, younger people are still unaffected. Our death rate isn't spiking from these variants and cases are meaningless at this point. Death rates will crash as the most vulnerable get vaccinated, and cases climb as people no longer feel a moral obligation to protect the elderly. Young people can die from any number of factors, including heart failure, this doesn't make Covid any more frighting. If nature wants you dead, you will be die. Modern medicine can't always save you. Bunkering in my house like a god damn idiot afraid of a Brazilian or UK variant of the China virus is pathetic.



Each store i've been to has dedicated senior hours, however these old fossils still struggle around hanging onto their carts for dear life at 6pm.
Those of us who are older than you are your future. You will become more like us, and realize that, as you, too, grow older.

But we are not so different from you, either.

One should not so readily dehumanize people, lest one be similarly dehumanized oneself.

It is no less easy to dismiss somebody as just another "know-nothing stupid kid" as it is to dismiss somebody as just an "old fossil".

While I continue to creep into a higher-risk category, I am far from "bunkering in my house". This has hardly altered my life at all, in fact, nor do I intend to let it.

And, while it's nice for shops to offer "dedicated senior hours", I suspect that those times are not particularly popular with most people of any age anyway. I'll shop at "6pm", or right up until Walmart-closing-time, or noon, or whenever I damned well please (which will be rather later than first crack of dawn), thank-you-very much.

I've managed to survive some stuff in the past (real and personal plus impending nuclear doom, impending global freezing doom, and more lately a couple of decades of global warming doom) and do not see this as anything worth overworrying, and I suspect that many of my age and much older think the same way.

And you will too, presuming that you live as long.

"Protecting the elderly" means those in retirement and nursing homes, where they are particularly vulnerable. And that is as it should be. They are still people, and still have (much younger) people who love them and want to have them around for a bit longer.

I understand your concerns, and agree with them. I recognize the damage caused, and yet-to-be-fully-realized, by lockdowns, and am not a fan.

But you might try being a little more diplomatic and empathetic in your posting style...
 

Mick

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I want to see data for non-virus ICU patients as well.

I reliable source told me that a local hospital's ICU was indeed full, but only had two virus-related patients. The bulk of the rest were drug overdoses.

Without a full breakdown, including comparisons to previous years, it's not possible to get a true idea of what is happening. What are the normal numbers for drug overdoses, suicide attempts, car/motorcycle smashes etcetera?

Why is this information not freely available? Is it simply that nobody sees it as relevant/important, or is it being deliberately unreported?

Conspiratorial minds need to know...


While the above link (from 01 Apr) doesn't specifically address how many non-COVID patients are in Ontario's ICUs, it does explain the urgency of the current situation, from ICU physicians' perspectives.


Current ICU COVID numbers are readily available, and Ontario currently has (as of 07 Apr) 504 COVID ICU patients, of which 311 are on ventilators.


According to the link above, as of 15 Dec 2020, Ontario had a capacity of 2136 ICU beds.

504 beds out of 2136 isn't insignificant, and these are beds that are no longer available for post- surgery patients etc.

I agree, it would be helpful if the various provincial governments would make non-COVID ICU data available for comparison, instead of making us rely on Google searches and dated news stories for info.
 

Loachman

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Thanks for that.

Yes, I am aware that the number, small as it is overall, is not insignificant (I'm in a relatively "quiet" area, which affects numbers) and I fully understand the perspective of the medical people and their physical and mental stress loads.

But their solution still harms many others in many ways, and the death toll and other damage resulting from lockdowns is either unknown or hidden. I read, somewhere, a few months ago, that one in five suicides is related to job loss. That was a US article, but, if true, should be about the same here. And how many unnecessary cancer deaths will show up over the next few years?

An article in the Toronto Star, yesterday, pointed out where infections were happening, but governments everywhere seem to have been targetting much-less-dangerous businesses while overlooking/ignoring the greater threats. Workers in those places, and their families, should definitely have priority access to vaccinations if they so wish.

But why were they not so accorded? Over a year into this, such oversights should not be happening.
 

Loachman

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What does protecting seniors have anything to do with lockdowns and restrictions. It's about time people start taking personal responsibility, don't want to chance getting infected...STAY HOME! I still see seniors who can barely move out in the middle of the day in crowded stores. This is who we are trying to protect, those who just don't care or are ignorant? It's been over a year of this gross government and 'expert' incompetence, my generations mental, physical and financial well being is more important than protecting those two don't want protection. Their lives are in their hands now. They had their life, it's our turn now.
It's most likely not the ones that you're seeing who are pushing for lockdowns. They're much more likely to be like you in that regard - they just want to live their lives as normally as possible as well, and have done their own threat assessments and balanced the risks against what they need to do to live. They're not asking for your protection.

But your life is worth no more than theirs, and they are still entitled to take their turn.
 

Mick

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Thanks for that.

Yes, I am aware that the number, small as it is overall, is not insignificant (I'm in a relatively "quiet" area, which affects numbers) and I fully understand the perspective of the medical people and their physical and mental stress loads.

But their solution still harms many others in many ways, and the death toll and other damage resulting from lockdowns is either unknown or hidden. I read, somewhere, a few months ago, that one in five suicides is related to job loss. That was a US article, but, if true, should be about the same here. And how many unnecessary cancer deaths will show up over the next few years?

An article in the Toronto Star, yesterday, pointed out where infections were happening, but governments everywhere seem to have been targetting much-less-dangerous businesses while overlooking/ignoring the greater threats. Workers in those places, and their families, should definitely have priority access to vaccinations if they so wish.

But why were they not so accorded? Over a year into this, such oversights should not be happening.
Very valid points. I realize that ICU doctors have a relatively narrow view: save / preserve capacity.

I would hope that public health officials would be taking additional factors into consideration i.e. economy, mental health, etc, as well as the downstream effects of their various restriction recommendations. I'm not sure about elsewhere, but here in Alberta, these decisions seem to be considered cabinet-confidences, so data justifying various measures is hard to come by.

Interestingly, Alberta has indicated it has a gradual reopening plan, based on population immunity.


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Loachman

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I cannot fault them for their view. That's their world, and watching people fight for life and die is not something that they enjoy.

From the political aspect, the virus infections, hospitalizations, and death tolls are easy metrics to publicize and also easy targets for criticism.

Nobody is likely to get much credit for limiting less-visible damage elsewhere, or future follow-on damage, so the easy way out and/or CYA measures win out.

And they are all getting paid regardless of what they do or don't do, unlike many of those under their "care".

But it's encouraging to see one premier turn on the light at the end of the tunnel. Hopefully, that will inspire imitation.
 

daftandbarmy

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An example of where 'smug' can take you....


How BC Fumbled the Third Wave​

Four experts say leaders were warned of the variant threat but misread key data and failed to respond fast enough.​


Disappointed. Disheartened. Discouraged. That’s how researchers The Tyee spoke with feel about British Columbia’s third wave. They warned the province about the threat posed by coronavirus variants, but the government didn’t listen or acted too slowly.

After successfully battling the first wave and coming closest to mirroring Atlantic Canada’s success story with COVID-19, B.C. has fallen from grace. Besieged by variants and now breaking record case counts, B.C. has joined the ranks of some of Canada’s worst performing provinces. Why?

To get answers The Tyee talked to four prominent experts, including Caroline Colijn, a professor and research chair in mathematics for evolution, infection and public health at Simon Fraser University; Sarah Otto, a specialist in evolutionary biology at the University of British Columbia; Jens von Bergmann, owner of MountainMath, an analytics company; and Amir Attaran, a professor of public health and law at the University of Ottawa.

They attribute B.C.’s missteps to a blend of wishful thinking, poor data, shying from hard decisions and ignoring independent models and reports that correctly foretold the variant crisis.

 

Bruce Monkhouse

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When I read those 'predictions' I always think "they could have easy just been wrong" and no one would have even paid attention. They certainly wouldn't be crowing about it......
 

OldTanker

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The most dangerous words in MSM: "According to experts" and "Studies have shown". I'm really glad I'm not in the position of having to make the difficult decisions in this pandemic. Stay safe.
 

daftandbarmy

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"End of Tour-itis" was something we were always acutely aware of and fought hard to cure. It was an inevitable disease that emerged as troops switched off as the finish line hove into view.

It's a killer, of course, as the bad guys like to bide their time and wait and watch your patterns over the preceding months, and then line you up for a few 'big bangs' just as you're mentally going through your post-tour leave options. That's when I put on, as I liked to call it, my 'asshole hat' and started dicking people around, breaking up comfortable routines and patterns and doubling the patrols/ searches etc.

It was also the time for all leaders to be there all the time, and get out of the Ops Room and other hidey holes, grab a rifle and a sense of humour, and go out with the bricks (day and night) to show that you're sharing the suck and keeping an eye on them. And that you care. This also gives you a chance to be scathingly honest during the post-patrol debriefs and really piss people off. 'Pissed off troops perk up', is a good cure for End of Tour-itis. The smart people figured it out and followed suit. Some of the smartest were the most junior, which I also found gratifying, and it was fun to see things like the most junior private leading the teams through a swamp rather than following the smelly old NCO along the drier path.

It's not a popularity contest; it's life and death.

Meanwhile, strike three:


Canada is losing the race between vaccines and variants as the 3rd wave worsens​

Social Sharing​

  • Variants rapidly outpacing vaccinations as third wave shows no signs of slowing down

But experts say Canada's slow vaccine roll out has failed to keep up with the exponential rise in variants in the third wave and the premature loosening of restrictions has led to an increase in hospitalizations and deaths — even in younger Canadians.

 

Good2Golf

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Provinces not sitting on COVID-19 doses, national vaccine logistics lead says

Article Link
OTTAWA -- The military general leading Canada’s national logistical rollout of COVID-19 vaccines is shooting down suggestions that provinces are not moving doses out of freezers and into people’s arms fast enough.

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“I think provinces and territories do their very best to administer as rapidly and as effectively as possible vaccines to Canadians throughout the country, full stop,” Maj.-Gen. Dany Fortin told reporters on Thursday during the latest vaccine briefing.


“No one is holding onto vaccines in the reserve… except for local readjustments. What I would say is, and based on a lot of conversations at all levels… what we see is a real desire to ensure that they have a constant flow of vaccines.”


To-date the federal government has delivered more than 10 million vaccine doses to the provinces and territories, and according to CTVNews.ca’s vaccine tracker, nearly 7.2 million of those shots have been administered as of Thursday afternoon.


With tens of millions more doses on the way over the next few months, the pressure is on premiers to show that they have plans in place to keep up with the supply and ensure clinics are able to administer vaccines as quickly as they can.


It was a topic of conversation between Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his provincial and territorial counterparts Wednesday night, following a restated offer for additional support to boost regional vaccination campaigns.


Elaborating on his remarks in an interview on CTV News Channel's Power Play, Fortin said: “Looking at the pure numbers doesn't necessarily give you the complete picture,” though across Canada the rate of immunization is “trending well,” considering the scope and complexity of the mass vaccination campaign.


He said the federal government is continually updating the provinces and territories on the expected size and timing of shipments so they can make sure they have confidence more supply is coming, and so they have the health workforce in place to immunize at full capacity.


Fortin said that it’s typically taking between two and five days to deliver vaccines across the country once they arrive in Canada, with the federal government assisting in seeing the batches arrive at central locations in each region and then taken from there by the provinces and territories to be distributed to what’s become hundreds of administration sites nationwide, from mass immunization centres to local pharmacies.


“Vaccines are in constant movement across the country,” Fortin said during his press conference, offering anecdotally that he’s heard from his ongoing communication with his counterparts stickhandling the provincial vaccine distributions of instances where the weather or other circumstances like staffing saw doses have to be shifted from one community to another, only to have to move them again the next day.


“They are doing their best, their very best, to deliver through all the various locations in their jurisdiction. That last mile, all the way to the point where Canadians get immunized, is different from one jurisdiction to another, and they're doing fantastic work immunizing as effectively as possible, given all the circumstances,” Fortin said.


Asked earlier in the week whether she thought provinces and territories are vaccinating fast enough, Health Minister Patty Hajdu wouldn’t say, offering just that she thinks provinces should be immunizing as fast as possible to work through their existing and upcoming supplies quickly.


“It's hard for me to give you a general answer because of course provinces and territories have very different strategies across the country, but what I can tell you is we're watching closely and we stand ready to assist any province or territory who's having a challenge in rolling out vaccination,” Hajdu said.


The rate of vaccinations is still limited by the logistics of getting doses from the loading dock to vaccination sites, and the time lag is fluctuating with the delivery schedules, with thousands of the most recently arrived vaccine shipments still moving through that system on Wednesday.


Weighing in on the situation in his province on Tuesday, Ford told reporters that the reason hundreds of thousands of vaccine doses are still in freezers in that province is because they had just arrived.


“Over the last few days, they just literally landed on our doorstep. It takes a day for the distribution, we got it out, and we're ready to go,” he said.


Canada is set to keep increasing the number of vaccines administered weekly, accelerating with the scheduled uptick in supply of doses being delivered.

As a result, Canada has been able to move up in the global vaccination rankings after shortages and delays this winter saw the country trail behind many nations.


Canada has now given at least one shot to 17 per cent of the population, still remaining far behind the United States and the U.K., though is ahead of the four other countries in the G7.


Potentially an outcome of the widely taken approach in Canada of focusing on first shots and delaying the second by up to four months, the nation’s ranking drops to second last in the G7 when counting those who have received both shots.


With files from CTV News’ Glen McGregor
 

Messerschmitt

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Goes to show how BS the whole lockdowns and masks are.

1 full month of texas being fully open with no masks and even a full baseball game.

The most dangerous words in MSM: "According to experts" and "Studies have shown". I'm really glad I'm not in the position of having to make the difficult decisions in this pandemic. Stay safe.
Everyone is an expert now. Also, "according to fact checkers".
 

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Quirky

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I would hope that public health officials would be taking additional factors into consideration i.e. economy, mental health, etc, as well as the downstream effects of their various restriction recommendations. I'm not sure about elsewhere, but here in Alberta, these decisions seem to be considered cabinet-confidences, so data justifying various measures is hard to come by.

They aren't. The only factor that is being taken into consideration is ICU capacity and cases. Every restriction and lock down imposed has been an emotional reaction with no rational thought behind to whatever end goal they see fit.
 

Jarnhamar

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Ontario gives hospitals power to transfer patients without consent as Theresa Tam calls for stricter COVID-19 controls​


Link

The first order allows physicians to transfer patients to field hospitals or a different hospital without their consent. The order says the transfer would only be allowed if the hospital is overwhelmed by COVID-19 or imminently risks being overwhelmed.

The second order allows community health agencies and Ontario Health to redeploy staff and overrides collective agreements and the union grievance process.

Wonder how well being ordered to "redeploy" contrary to collective agreements will go over.
 

Bruce Monkhouse

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Won't be a problem....“Staff will have the right to refuse a deployment assignment,”

As far as overriding collective agreements,...Rae days is an easy one that comes to mind that everyone knows about, and that was certainly no emergency. My agreement says 16 hour days are the longest one can work, done more then 16 many times, it's called things like 'compromise, get 'er done, peoples safety, etc.
 

mariomike

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,...Rae days is an easy one that comes to mind that everyone knows about, and that was certainly no emergency.
Rae Days cost us 144 hours pay at straight time. But, you gained 144 hours of overtime at time-and-a-half.

Wonder how well being ordered to "redeploy" contrary to collective agreements will go over.

Mandated overtime. Change of schedule. Change of station. Working quarantine. It's all in the collective agreement, as well as the premium pay that goes along with it.
 

Mick

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They aren't. The only factor that is being taken into consideration is ICU capacity and cases. Every restriction and lock down imposed has been an emotional reaction with no rational thought behind to whatever end goal they see fit.
No government wants to kill the economy or impose unpopular measures.

As I said, if governments would be more transparent with regards to data driving their decision-making, people would be less inclined to make inaccurate assumptions and resort to hyperbole.
 
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