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VAC mental health services

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Hello everyone, been a long time since I posted on here. I have a question and am looking for opinions from those that have dealt with VAC for mental health concerns.

Im a 2008 vet and always believed my mental health was great. I have since had a lot of discovery, especially in the past two years and after discussing this at length with my wife I have come to the realization I have been living with anxiety for years and it is negatively affecting my family. I believe this may have been a result of my tour as I do not recall these behaviors prior, I always thought this was normal for vets and just intermittently coped with alcohol(which I have been working on quitting with some minor success). Is it worth my while speaking with VAC to get some help? Or has there been such a large time in between my service(got out in 2014) and now that this will be pushed off as a result of living life?

Thank you all for your input in advance, I appreciate your time!
 

PuckChaser

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Call OSSIS. You'll find a peer to talk to that knows what it's like being in the CAF. They'll get you plugged in with VAC and appointments with counsellors set up for you no questions asked. It's the one thing they do right. You can then follow up with a full claim once you've established that service link.

My father was in a similar situation and I got him a coffee appointment with an OSSIS peer support worker. Turns out they were on the same tour. Things moved very quickly to get him the help he needed after that.
 

brihard

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Hey brother,

It's never too late. You stepped up, did what you were asked to do, and like many there are some long term effects from it. There's no shame in that, and it can take along time to realize that not all is as it should be. It can also simply take many years for negative effects of your service and experiences to really show up and say "Hey, I'm here".

You deserve to be the best you can be for yourself and for your family and friends. Fundamentally this is medical. The brain is an organ too, and it's not one we have figured out particularly well. If you're sitting here now feeling that something isn't the way it used to be, and if it's having any detrimental impact on you and yours, it's 100% legit to want to get that looked after.

The first step is talking to a medical professional who can help you figure out what's going on. The OSI clinics are excellent, and are very, very used to dealing with vets, including those who come out of the woodwork years down the road. https://www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/heal...and-wellness/assessment-treatment/osi-clinics

Stepping up and admitting you might need help can be frightening and embarrassing, but it's the right thing to do, and many have been there before. These sorts of illnesses/injuries don't get better on their own - but, with help, for most they DO get better, and a healthy and productive life can be lived. It's absolutely worth it.

There are a number of members here who've been through this, and any of us will be happy to help answer any questions you have- or if we can't, figure out who can.
 

catalyst

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Or has there been such a large time in between my service(got out in 2014) and now that this will be pushed off as a result of living life?
Folks are still coming forward from WWII. This is quite normal - give VAC a call.
 

JBD

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I have been out since 1993 and I went for help in 2018. Yes if you need help get help. Veterans affairs has its own mental health clinics that they can refer you to. Time does not erase trauma. My only regret is not doing it sooner.
 
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