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Seeking Ideas for "Scenarios of Problems" - Teaching M203.06

LittleBlackDevil

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I'm going to be teaching the class M203.06 - Employ Problem Solving this week; this will be my first time teaching a cadet class.

The Instructional Guide mentioned a couple of times, as a training aid, "Scenarios of Problems". There is no such thing in the Instructional Guide or QSP. So I take it that I am supposed to compose some of my own scenarios before teaching the class.

Anyone have some suggestions/ideas for appropriate scenarios that you think cadets might enjoy?
 

macarena

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Solving problems in which area?
In personnal ennoying cadets doing bullying based on different cultures?
Or when having trouble to light a broken gas-lamp in a cold and winter night, when having a whole section depending on your success?
Or trouble when passing the swimning test on the BMQ, being forced to use a saving vest wrong attached that keeps forcing you to drown?
Or having trouble to avoid the sergeant legs, when passing your C9 handling test, and the sergeant keeps blasting you and again pointing the gun against his own legs?
I am trying to help, but I can't figure out which field of experiences would be good for you to present to the Bob's.
 

LittleBlackDevil

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Thanks for the ideas ... I'm not really sure what field of experiences would be good either.

The one sample problem that M203.06 gives in Annex A for the written assignment is "In recently studying about the environment, cadets decide to initiate the creation of a recycling program at the corps."

They're supposed to employ the logical method of problem solving so I think it's supposed to be a bit more complex.

I did find an annex to C203.02 which gives a bunch of cadet specific scenarios, for example "You and five other Red Star cadets are tasked to set up a classroom for a class that will begin in ten minutes. You arrive to find the door to your classroom locked. The officer who is supposed to have the key is nowhere to be found."

Maybe this is the "scenarios" that the Instructional guide referenced. But considering that the cadets were taught C203.02 just last week, they will already be familiar with these scenarios.

I am considering doing a military scenario since our corps is affiliated to infantry and I'm a former infantry officer. Something simple like, there's an enemy gun nest that you need to get your squad past. "There is open field ahead, a swamp to one side, and forest to the other. What do you do?" Kind of thing. Not exactly applicable to them but it illustrates problem solving and it may pique their interest while instructing. Then have them to a cadet themed problem for their test.
 

daftandbarmy

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LittleBlackDevil said:
Thanks for the ideas ... I'm not really sure what field of experiences would be good either.

The one sample problem that M203.06 gives in Annex A for the written assignment is "In recently studying about the environment, cadets decide to initiate the creation of a recycling program at the corps."

They're supposed to employ the logical method of problem solving so I think it's supposed to be a bit more complex.

I did find an annex to C203.02 which gives a bunch of cadet specific scenarios, for example "You and five other Red Star cadets are tasked to set up a classroom for a class that will begin in ten minutes. You arrive to find the door to your classroom locked. The officer who is supposed to have the key is nowhere to be found."

Maybe this is the "scenarios" that the Instructional guide referenced. But considering that the cadets were taught C203.02 just last week, they will already be familiar with these scenarios.

I am considering doing a military scenario since our corps is affiliated to infantry and I'm a former infantry officer. Something simple like, there's an enemy gun nest that you need to get your squad past. "There is open field ahead, a swamp to one side, and forest to the other. What do you do?" Kind of thing. Not exactly applicable to them but it illustrates problem solving and it may pique their interest while instructing. Then have them to a cadet themed problem for their test.

Ummm... how about starting with the combat estimate process and section battle drills?
 

CBH99

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Perhaps STAR format it?


Situation
Task
Actions Needed or Undertaken
Result or Desired Result



:dunno:
 

LittleBlackDevil

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Thanks, all, I've got the process of problem solving down instruction-wise.

What I'm trying to brainstorm is sample problems to have the cadets solve using the process/technique.
 

daftandbarmy

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LittleBlackDevil said:
Thanks, all, I've got the process of problem solving down instruction-wise.

What I'm trying to brainstorm is sample problems to have the cadets solve using the process/technique.

Ask them to plan out the training plan for the Corps over the next year using a ‘Tiger Team’ approach, and present at least 3 x COA to the CO.

No pressure :)
 

Jarnhamar

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[quote author=LittleBlackDevil]
I am considering doing a military scenario since our corps is affiliated to infantry and I'm a former infantry officer. Something simple like, there's an enemy gun nest that you need to get your squad past. "There is open field ahead, a swamp to one side, and forest to the other. What do you do?" Kind of thing. Not exactly applicable to them but it illustrates problem solving and it may pique their interest while instructing. Then have them to a cadet themed problem for their test.
[/quote]

Be prepared to explain to your CO, or higher, why you're teaching children small-team combat tactics and war fighting skills.
 

daftandbarmy

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Jarnhamar said:
Be prepared to explain to your CO, or higher, why you're teaching children small-team combat tactics and war fighting skills.

Great point!

How about search and rescue scenarios like this one, which become more relevant the older I get :)

You might even be able to invite SAR volunteers in to help out:

Scenario #1 - GROUND SEARCH

An elderly male dementia patient has walked away from a residence in a rural area. He has done this before. It is now 1900hrs. He has been missing for four hours and needs medication. He is physically capable of walking several kilometres, but is not dressed to be outdoors.

https://www.bcsara.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/RADeMS-Scenarios.pdf
 

LittleBlackDevil

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Jarnhamar said:
Be prepared to explain to your CO, or higher, why you're teaching children small-team combat tactics and war fighting skills.

Is there a CATO out there that outlines exactly how much army stuff we are allowed to do with/teach army cadets? I'm not clear on where the line is ... I know it was pretty much forbidden at one point, but they've loosened things up a bit (like allowing paintball).

That said, I'm not too concerned about my CO she is very reasonable and I'd be able to justify myself. But higher ups might have issues and I don't want to cause her headache if some parent calls her or Det upset. I'll stick to cadet or civilians scenarios.
 

The Bread Guy

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daftandbarmy said:
Ask them to plan out the training plan for the Corps over the next year using a ‘Tiger Team’ approach, and present at least 3 x COA to the CO.

No pressure :)
If this is too complex for a single classroom session, think about events or tasks the unit has been given in the past (fundraising, Remembrance Day, etc.), and maybe take one of those apart re:  ways to use the decision-making format.
 

Burrows

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Just a few things (mainly as personal opinion/experience)

1) There are many things that can be taught under CAF Familiarization.  The nature of these lessons may be the same but the content is "cadet-ized".  For example - field movements and cam and concealment can directly to translate to moving along a route and why things are seen.  A practical exercise absolutely could be to have cadets move silently to an objective without being seen and record and report observations.  (With that said, having that objective being defined as an enemy MG nest and cadets conducting a full scale platoon attack would be crossing a line - particularly for a problem solving exercise).

2) CAF familiarization must be conducted by a person who holds the qual within the CAF.  This is a great way to engage your affiliated unit.  You will find that once you introduce a couple switched on Cpl/MCpl reservists, with a clear plan, the cadets will literally forget officers exist.

3) Keep in mind that the focus of problem solving is to identify and solve a problem through a process.  If you want something that inherently writes itself, ask them to identify an issue at the unit and come up with a plan.  (Ex.  Recruitment needs to be improved, retention issues, bullying, etc.)  This approach will engage the cadets at their level with things that they understand and that directly impacts them.

I think the recycling program example is a little bit off-base, particularly when there are many examples that both cadets and staff can understand from a shared view of inside the unit.  If you look at solving a local problem, you may actually find out about problems you never knew existed.

4) SMESC can be an excellent complimentary training for problem solving, because the reality is that problem solving requires planning.

Situation (Problem)
Mission (Solve the Problem)
Execution (How we will solve the problem)
Service Support (What tools do we need to solve the problem)
Command and Signals (What role will people play in solving the problem)
 

LittleBlackDevil

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Yes, I jettisoned the recycling problem for one on improving recruiting and developing a "marketing plan". Our corps is quite small so this is legitimate. The cadets came up with some very creative ideas. I am going to talk to the CO about possibly implementing some of them.

On a side note, one of the steps in the logical process per M203.06 is to consider safety issues for the plans. It was appalling to learn that the cadets have experienced verbal abuse from adults when out tagging. Some people are just so anti-military and fancy themselves pacifists that they think bullying children is acceptable. Absolutely disgusting.
 
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