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Repatriation Row

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The Repatriation of our fallen WO. Roberge, Sgt. Kruse, Pte Freeman

Tuesday 30th December 2008

Flt/Arr 14:00hrs CFB Trenton

Please join us along Repatriation Row out side the fence at CFB Trenton to pay respect to the fallen and their families

DSCF2128.jpg
 

Nfld Sapper

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How do you know this? No official notice released by National Defence yet (that I can find).
 
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The NFLD Grinch said:
How do you know this? No official notice released by National Defence yet (that I can find).
You can find all info by calling  Air Passenger Terminal CFB Tretnon 800-487-1186
 

Civvymedic

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If your in the Toronto area 680 AM Radio news is a good source as well as www.durhamregion.com.

We will as always be on the bridges along the highway.

Rob.
Durham Region Paramedic
 
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Civvymedic said:
If your in the Toronto area 680 AM Radio news is a good source as well as www.durhamregion.com.

We will as always be on the bridges along the highway.

Rob.
Durham Region Paramedic
For those that live in the Toronto area, members of the Canadian Army Veterans Motorcycle Unit
and members of the public will assemble at Coroners Offices,
Grenville Street just west of Yonge Street 1545 hrs, to pay their respect.
 

ruckmarch

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Sarge Hill 677 said:
For those that live in the Toronto area, members of the Canadian Army Veterans Motorcycle Unit
and members of the public will assemble at Coroners Offices,
Grenville Street just west of Yonge Street 1545 hrs, to pay their respect.

Is this on Tuesday the 30th?
 

YYC Retired

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To all those out in Ontario that get out and pay their respects to our fallen as they travel from Trenton to Toronto..... WELL DONE!!

I know those of you that get out there will say thing's like "it's the least we can do".... but still.... well done!

The folks I mix with here in Calgary, military, ex-military, police and EMS always speak so highly of all of you that show the family the much needed support as they travel by.
 

ruckmarch

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For those in Toronto and the GTA, where will be a good spot to stand or wait for the motorcade?
 

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ruckmarch said:
For those in Toronto and the GTA, where will be a good spot to stand or wait for the motorcade?

With great pride, our Toronto EMS Honour Guard joins members of the Canadian Forces, Toronto Police and Toronto Fire Services at the
Coroner's Office.  TEMS also posts ambulances along bridges inside city limits. 
The Department notifies us of every repatriation:

Repatriation of Pte Michael Freeman, WO Gaetan Roberge & Sgt Gregory Kruse - Tuesday, 30 December 2008 14h00:
"The remains of our three fallen will arrive at 8 Wing, Canadian Forces
Base Trenton, on Tuesday, 30 December 2008 at 14h00. The cortege will
repatriate the remains of Pte Freeman, WO Roberge and Sgt Kruse on this
day, arriving at the Toronto boundary at approximately 16h00 - 16h30.
The TIME IS CONFIRMED as of this message per the Canadian Forces
Mortuary Services. "

Please note: Arrival is east bound from Bay St via Grenville entrance ( NOT Grosvenor ). 
 

Civvymedic

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ruckmarch,

Where I am from and work. Durham Region, the busy spots are Brock street in Whitby, not to be confused with Brock road in Pickering. Harwood ave. in Ajax, and Waverly road in Bowmanville.

These bridges have more room to stand than some others, better shoulders beside the bridges, and recently Durham Police have reduced vehicle traffic to one lane both ways with cruisers at either end to facilitate the crowds and for safety.

 

ENGINEERS WIFE

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ruckmarch said:
For those in Toronto and the GTA, where will be a good spot to stand or wait for the motorcade?

ruckmarch

When I lived in TO I would go to the Victoria Park overpass, and the motorcade would usually go under us about 2 1/2-3 hrs after the plane landed in Trenton.  So, if it lands at 2pm, it would get there usually around 4:45 and there are always people there. And if driving the sidewalk is wide enough to park on or there is a church on the south side of the overpass and a Timmies on the north side to park at.  Hope you can make it.
Robin
SOT
 

ruckmarch

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I just got back from the repatriation parade in Toronto @ the coroners office. Thanks to mariomike for giving me directions. There were a few of us reg force officers and NCMs there.

There was an injured soldier that came out after all the hearse arrived, and he got a round of applause from us all, don't really know his story. I was proud to be a soldier, standing along other law enforcement comrades and the general public, especially the veteran biker group that have been to all of the repatriations.

RIP soldiers  :salute:
 

Nfld Sapper

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ruckmarch said:
I just got back from the repatriation parade in Toronto @ the coroners office. Thanks to mariomike for giving me directions. There were a few of us reg force officers and NCMs there.

There was an injured soldier that came out after all the hearse arrived, and he got a round of applause from us all, don't really know his story. I was proud to be a soldier, standing along other law enforcement comrades and the general public, especially the veteran biker group that have been to all of the repatriations.

RIP soldiers  :salute:

If he was in CADPAT (AR) then maybe he was one of the escorts
 

mariomike

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ruckmarch said:
I just got back from the repatriation parade in Toronto @ the coroners office. Thanks to mariomike for giving me directions. There were a few of us reg force officers and NCMs there.

I was there.
Our Honour Guard will always be there.
Please don't be put off by our rifles. They've never been used, and only dropped once.
http://www.torontoems.ca/main-site/images/photos/hg-DSC_3093.jpg
 
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ruckmarch said:
I just got back from the repatriation parade in Toronto @ the coroners office. Thanks to mariomike for giving me directions. There were a few of us reg force officers and NCMs there.

There was an injured soldier that came out after all the hearse arrived, and he got a round of applause from us all, don't really know his story. I was proud to be a soldier, standing along other law enforcement comrades and the general public, especially the veteran biker group that have been to all of the repatriations.

RIP soldiers  :salute:

It's a moving experince in everyones life that have witness these Repatriations, it's a moment that they will never forget. The turnout at CFB Trenton was hugh 200+ even in the fridgid cold.

STANDDOWN SOLDIER, YOU ARE NOW HOMEWARD HOME :salute: :cdn:
 

ENGINEERS WIFE

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ruckmarch said:
I just got back from the repatriation parade in Toronto @ the coroners office. Thanks to mariomike for giving me directions. There were a few of us reg force officers and NCMs there.

There was an injured soldier that came out after all the hearse arrived, and he got a round of applause from us all, don't really know his story. I was proud to be a soldier, standing along other law enforcement comrades and the general public, especially the veteran biker group that have been to all of the repatriations.

RIP soldiers  :salute:


I found this article, thought this might be who you were asking about.

Wounded Master Cpl. Hugh Brennan has spent this New Year's in his hotel room waiting for the phone to ring.

When it does he will travel one more time with Pte. Michael Freeman, his close friend killed in the line of duty Dec. 26, for the final leg of his journey home to Peterborough.

"At some point the coroner is going to call," Brennan said in an interview last night. "I don't know when."

In Toronto, he waits and licks his physical, psychological and emotional wounds received as he was sitting beside Freeman when he was killed in Afghanistan.

An autopsy has to be conducted on the 28-year-old who died after being blown up by an improvised explosive device on Boxing Day near the Canadian Armed Forces base near Kandahar. He is one of 104 Canadian soldiers to die in Afghanistan and one of nine in the month of December.

And to think, less than a week ago Brennan and Freeman, and all of the rest of the LAV (light armoured vehicle) team of 3rd Battalion Royal Canadian Regiment's 5 Platoon based in Petawawa, were celebrating Christmas.

The next day it was back to work. Nine Canadian soldiers climbed into the LAV and headed out on patrol.

"We stopped for lunch at the forward operating base," recalled Brennan, who grew up in Belleville and whose parents now live in Napanee. "Then we headed back out and at 12:45 it happened."

The blast was severe.

"I saw yellow smoke and smelled diesel," said Brennan. "Then I saw and felt rocks hitting me in the face. It was happening fast but it felt like it was going on for 10 minutes."

The badly damaged LAV ended up on its side. "For me it felt like getting punched in the face," he said. "We were hit really hard."

When the dust literally settled, one by one the crew tried to get out of the vehicle.

"Because of my pack I was stuck," he said.

Seated next to Freeman, he was looking to try to get him out. He then he heard the words that have been ringing in his ears ever since.

"Somebody yelled, 'Mike's gone. You have to get out because the vehicle is on fire.'"

At that point "one of the guys pulled me out." He saw some of the crew "lying on the ground" and the "crew commander administering first aid."

Brennan's back was badly twisted and he received several deep puncture wounds. "What really surprised me was how calm everyone was," said Brennan, who is on his second tour in Afghanistan. "We had to get something done and we did it."

Several needed medical attention but will recover. Freeman took the brunt of the blast.

"It is always in the back of our minds," he said of IED's.

But you learn to live with it. "We all know if it happens, it happens," he said.

It happened to them.

And even though they rationalize it, the last few days, being with him when he died and then being the one who escorts him home, has been devastating for the 25-year-old Brennan, who is on pain medication.

"I don't know if it has hit me yet," he said of his friend's death. "The hardest part is I have not seen his family yet. That is going to be hard."

That will happen when the coroner releases Freeman's body. Brennan will travel with him to Peterborough where there will be a funeral on Monday.

He said he is bringing home one special soldier. And one special person. "He was an extremely hard worker and one of the best drivers I have ever known," said Brennan of his pal. "When we would ***** and complain he would just laugh about it."

Nothing fazed him. He was the capable driver who always knew what to do and when to do it.

"I gave him the name Chewy -- as in Chewbacca from Star Wars," said Brennan, for the first time in our interview offering a short chuckle.

"He called me Han Solo," he said. "I would say punch it Chewy and then we would take off (in the LAV)."

Away from battle and patrols, Freeman was an interesting young man who had a young, kind, adventurous and generous spirit. "His dad sent him his golf clubs and he has his own driving range near our tent," said Brennan. "When he would hit balls, the local kids would run out and get them. He would always pay them with candy and food. He was priceless. He was like everybody's crazy brother. He was a real character."

The Canadian soldiers enjoy the Afghan people -- which makes it so difficult to accept that some of the population wants them dead. But, he said, it is the minority. "I have seen the positive," Brennan said of the work Canadians have achieved there. "I believe a good percentage does appreciate that but some are on the fence and those are the ones we have to (convince)."

Until they do, they are deadly. "The insurgents have no chance in a firefight. We would take them out every time, so using the IED's is their only chance," he said. "They are getting pretty good at it."

The military investigates every death and wherever possible eradicates those responsible and destroys their laboratories. As far as appropriate retribution toward those who killed Freeman and two others the next day, his response was "use one's imagination."

The fact those in combat zones are at constant risk does not deter them. They are a close-knit unit, who would all dive in front of a bullet to save each other. "Watching the guys say goodbye to him in Kandahar was really hard," he said.

But witnessing the outpouring of emotion on the Highway of Heroes trek from CFB Trenton to Toronto Tuesday, solidified for him that a country is behind them. "I don't think there has been a moment in my life when I was prouder to be a Canadian," said Brennan, who limped over to the crowd and shook the hands and hugged supporters as he arrived in Toronto. "It was special and breathtaking."

He said he had heard of the Highway of Heroes but didn't realize it would be like that. He plans to tell his fellow soldiers when he gets back to the war. "Once I am healed up I am going to go back overseas," he said, adding Pte. Freeman would have done that if he had lived and it was someone else who died. "I don't want to leave my section shorthanded."

Before he can get back to help, there's a phone call and a funeral that have to happen first.



http://www.torontosun.com/news/columnists/joe_warmington/
 
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