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R.I.P.Trooper Marc Diab 8 March 2009

fire_guy686

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Rest Easy Trooper Diab.  :salute: :cdn:

Thoughts and Prayers to his family.

Speedy recovery to the injured as well.
 

1feral1

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Sorry to hear of more bad news.

My thoughts are with his Mates in theatre, and those he knew back in Canada.

OWDU
 

manhole

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our condolences to the family and friends  of Tpr Diab.  A speedy recovery to the wounded.  :salute:
 

OldSolduer

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RIP Trooper Diab.  :salute: :cdn:
You have done your duty, now we WILL do ours. You shall not be forgotten.

Our condolences to the family of Trooper Diab. We know only too well, as other families do, what you are going through.

Our best wishes for a speedy recovery to the wounded. :salute:
 

mariomike

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From Toronto Emergency Services:

The remains of our fallen is anticipated to arrive at 8 Wing, Canadian Forces Base Trenton, on Wednesday, 11 March, 2009 at 14h00.  The cortege will  repatriate the remains of Trooper Diab will arrive at the Toronto boundary at approximately 15h45 - 16h15. 

THIS DATE AND TIME ARE NOW CONFIRMED. 

UPDATED 10 Mar 09:

Where:  8 Wing, Canadian Forces Base Trenton, Ontario.

When:  Thursday, March 12, 2009 at 2:00 p.m.



[EDIT to update timings of arrival in Trenton.]
 

MayhemInc

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Good day to you all.

The sad news of this tragedy is far reaching, Trooper Marc Diab was a well liked and respected member of the offroading community here in Ontario as well, and we will all miss him greatly.
He was a member of an ontario-based online community called Jeepkings.ca and we all wish to pay our respects once he comes home, however we are not very knowledgeable in how.  If anyone would be willing to guide us on appropriate protocols and behavior it would be greatly appreciated.  There is quite a large contingent in our community who would like to participate and have considered tailing the procession down the highway to escort our Hero home.

I will be following this thread closely but if anyone wishes to reach me pls doso by emailing mayhemoffroad@hotmail.com

Condolences from our community here: http://www.jeepkings.ca/forums/showthread.php?t=88274

Fallen Hero run info here:  http://www.jeepkings.ca/forums/showthread.php?t=88315


Cheers, and be well to all.
 

ENGINEERS WIFE

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Canadian soldier always dreamed of military career
Updated Mon. Mar. 9 2009 12:22 PM ET

The Canadian Press

TORONTO -- The latest Canadian soldier killed in Afghanistan began dreaming of a career in the military when he was just a child, his mother said Monday.

Marc Diab, 22, was killed Sunday in a roadside bomb attack that wounded four other Canadian soldiers. He was the 112th Canadian soldier to die as part of the Afghan mission since 2002 and the fourth in less than a week.

His mother, Jihan Diab, said from her Mississauga, Ont., home that her son was proud to be in the military and was fulfilling a dream.

"Marc called himself a soldier since he was probably eight, or before that," she said.

"What a hero he is. He was never scared, he wanted peace for every single part of the world."

Diab, whose family emigrated to Canada from war-torn Lebanon in 2000, wanted to continue his military career after his current five-year stint was up in 2011.

"He had plans to study and do something else within the military, I don't know what it was," his mother said. "He told me, 'mom it's good, I won't be in danger so much."'

Diab also planned to settle down with his long-time girlfriend, Mary Barakat, after she finished university, his mother added.

"He was planning to buy an apartment and to invest in this and that and to build a family."

The attack that killed Diab, a member of the Royal Canadian Dragoons based in Petawawa, Ont., happened in the southern portion of Shah Wali Kot district, a mountainous region and well known transit point for Taliban fighters entering the province.

Just last week three other soldiers -- Warrant Officer Dennis Raymond Brown, Cpl. Dany Olivier Fortin and Cpl. Kenneth Chad O'Quinn -- were killed in a roadside bombing in Arghandab, northwest of Kandahar city.

In Afghanistan, Brig.-Gen. Jonathan Vance said Diab died in "pursuit of a noble goal" -- the desire to transform an "unstable and impoverished country into a secure and self-sufficient nation."

Prime Minister Stephen Harper said Diab "paid the ultimate price" for his country, and his life and death serves as an example of the bravery of Canadian soldiers on this mission.

Diab loved children and was the leader of the yearly church camp for kids, his mother added.

"He wanted more kids to attend this year ... he was preparing for it even from there (Afghanistan)."

The four other soldiers wounded Sunday are reported in stable condition and three of them were to be evacuated to a U.S. Army hospital in Landstuhl, Germany for further care.

http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/story/CTVNews/20090309/soldier_returning_090309/20090309?hub=TopStories


Our fallen hero is on his way home.  :cdn: :salute:

RIP Trooper Diab
 

Loachman

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I was "overhead" (by remote control) the site about thirty minutes after the strike and remained there for a couple of hours providing overwatch for those responding, until out of fuel. Not a pleasant task at all. We had the ramp ceremony this evening. I saw Strike and Recce by Death there, and Midnight Rambler was as well, plus many others that I know but not on here.

My condolences to c/s 6, the RCD, and Marc's family and friends.

 

Nfld Sapper

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Media Advisory
Our Fallen Soldier Returns Home
LFCA MA 09-02 - March 10, 2009


OTTAWA – Our fallen soldier, Trooper Marc Diab from The Royal Canadian Dragoons based at CFB Petawawa, will return home to Canada on Thursday, March 12, 2009.

Where:  8 Wing, Canadian Forces Base Trenton, Ontario.

When:  Thursday, March 12, 2009 at 2:00 p.m.

What:    At the wishes of the families, media will be permitted on the tarmac.

Present to pay their respects will be Her Excellency The Governor General of Canada, The Right Honourable Michaëlle Jean, Minister of National Defence, The Honourable Peter Gordon MacKay, Chief of Defence Staff, General Walt Natynczyk and other dignitaries.

Trooper Diab was killed and four other Canadian soldiers were injured when an improvised explosive device detonated near an armoured vehicle during a patrol in the Shah Wali Kot District. The incident occurred north-east of Kandahar City at around 1:15 p.m., Kandahar time, on 8 March, 2009.

-30-

Note to Editors/News Directors:

Interested media may contact Captain Mark Peebles, 8 Wing/CFB Trenton Public Affairs Officer, who can be reached at 613-392-2811, ext. 2041, or at: peebles.m@forces.gc.ca

For general queries, please contact the Media Liaison Office at 1-866-377-0811, or on weekends at 613-792-2973. For flight information, please contact the Air Passenger Terminal at 1-800-487-1186
 

Nfld Sapper

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mariomike said:
From Toronto Emergency Services:

The remains of our fallen is anticipated to arrive at 8 Wing, Canadian Forces Base Trenton, on Wednesday, 11 March, 2009 at 14h00.  The cortege will  repatriate the remains of Trooper Diab will arrive at the Toronto boundary at approximately 15h45 - 16h15. 

THIS DATE AND TIME ARE NOW CONFIRMED.

Your dates are wrong please check the Media Advisory issued by National Defence.
 

mariomike

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NFLD Sapper said:
Your dates are wrong please check the Media Advisory issued by National Defence.

I did. You are right and what I posted is wrong.
I am so sorry! That's what they sent us!
Moderator - please delete my earlier post. My apoligies. 
 

mariomike

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I attended the Coroner's Office today for Trooper Diab. Two Dragoons ( a Sergeant in desert uniform and a W.O. in dress uniform ) came out and shook our hands.    :cdn:
 

OldSolduer

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I've been on that trip down the Highway. Tpr Diab and Mike were the same age. I felt this one...hard.  :salute:

RIP Tpr Diab.  :salute: :cdn:
 

leroi

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A very moving editorial; I suspect the writer refers to Trooper Diab but her words are relevant to all who've made this journey :cdn:

'Stand Down, Soldier. Your Job is Done. You Can Go Home'

http://www.intelligencer.ca/PrintArticle.aspx?e=1473965

Updated 10 hours ago
Editorial: Patricia Calder
Belleville Intelligencer (Shared in Accordance with the Fair Dealing Provision of the Copyright Act)


There is a banner someone brings to the fence of Canadian Forces Base Trenton whenever there is a repatriation of a soldier killed in Afghanistan. It reads: "Stand down, soldier. Your job is done. You can go home."

People line up along the fence surrounding CFB Trenton waiting for the aircraft from Afghanistan to touch down, open its cargo door, and offer up its burden. Some of the onlookers are civilians, some are retired service men and women, some are on leave from active service and dress in uniform for the occasion. Some of them even bring young children.

There's a large contingent of bikers, the Blue Knights, wearing distinctive blue vests. One couple is visiting from Nova Scotia. Another man has just come home from Europe. The gathering spreads farther along the fence as each carload stakes out its waiting spot, like a parade crowd without the fun.

Soon the CC-150 Polaris transport plane comes into view. A hush falls over the people standing at the fence. The aircraft circles into position near the hanger where a family stands in the wind and cold to receive their loved one.

The silhouettes, especially the shoulders, speak of their exquisite pain. They might never again see the body in the casket, but in their mind's eye, they can picture that beloved form touched so often in the past.

Their eyes are transfixed on the wooden box that is now being hoisted onto strong shoulders and carried toward the hearse in measured steps.

How can this moment be happening? It is surreal with its grey skies, charcoal jet, grey terminal, and cement tarmac. The only colour is the Canadian flag draped in its sombre duty like a blanket over the fallen comrade. It seems to speak the words from the banner: "Stand down, soldier. Your job is done. You can go home."

After a 20-minute repatriation service the casket is loaded into a black hearse. The family members get in a limousine. Slowly the convoy exits the gates of 8 Wing-Canadian Forces Base Trenton.

Those bikers, a club of retired soldiers, have formed an honour guard and salute as their fallen comrade passes between them. The line of on-lookers has moved from the fence to the side of Highway 2 and they too salute, not in soldierly fashion, but with their hearts.

The black vehicles are escorted front and back by two police cars as they drive onto the celebrated Highway of Heroes. A signal is sent to a police car waiting on the ramp of the next overpass along the way to Toronto: "Cortege en route. ETA 15 minutes."

Each officer on duty on an overpass receives the message in turn as the cars process along the route. Then the police radio the message to the fire fighters and ambulance workers in kiss-and-go parking lots who have been anticipating the final good-bye.

The service vehicles start their engines and move into position. Each fire truck and ambulance rides to the top of its respective overpass.

The police car drives down the ramp to block traffic from entering Highway 401. The cortege will be permitted to drive solo all the way. The crowd on the overpass is watching for that space of several minutes when there is no traffic in the westbound lanes. Then a whisper is telegraphed from one person to another: "They're coming. They're coming." By this time not one space is left unoccupied along the railing.

I stand by the sign that welcomes drivers to Brighton. I want to be as near as possible to the cortege. My student will be passing by. His sister, also a former student at my school, will be sitting in the limo with her Mom and Dad behind the dark glass.

The last time I saw these siblings they were sitting innocently in a classroom.

On one side of me stands a young man with a camera ready to take pictures to show his little boy. On the other side is a member of the Legion, a retired Sergeant-major dressed in khaki. He is the first to sight the cortege and barks instinctively, "Heads up!" to everyone on the overpass.

I am frozen in place, steeling myself against an onslaught of emotion, tears burning behind my glasses. The Sergeantmajor snaps a salute and, even though he is a complete stranger, I feel supported by his experience and professionalism.

Behind me the people who have come to the overpass for just this moment wave their flags. The dark glass of the limo opens and a long arm in a black coat ending in a black glove answers in silent acknowledgment.

In less than a moment the cortege is gone. The Sergeant-major offers his arm to assist my climb up the embankment and we talk about the weather.

Only now do I notice how many young people have also been standing vigils at the overpass. They look to me like students skipping school.

Who are all these other people? Does each of them have a connection as I do to the fallen soldier? Some of them are relaying messages by cellphone to other overpasses down the line. Are all the on-lookers on all the overpasses along the Highway of Heroes connected, like a web that stretches from Trenton to Toronto cradling the casket of the fallen at its centre?

What a strange experience our presence creates. A unique made-in-Canada ad-hoc ritual that leaves participants feeling richer, and sadder, and more connected for having spent this one moment in the wind.


Copyright © 2009 Belleville Intelligencer
 

wildman0101

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rest in peace trooper diab  :salute:
canada will remember you  :cdn:
condolences to family,,,comrades,,, and friends...  :yellow:
                  scoty b  :(
 
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