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IMP’s

Gunnar

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So, limited contact with issue foodstuffs in general, but do IMP’s still exist? Certainly in the Cadets, I’ve only seen MRE’s. Now I understand that MRE’s are ubiquitous and cheap, but can IMP’s still be had? Are they soldier-only?

Meals Rejected by Everyone actually can be pretty tasty, but their aftereffects are sub-optimal. Are IMP’s any different?
 

MedCorps

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IMPs are still very real and in use in the Regular Force. Most expensive way to field soldiers.
 

quadrapiper

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So, limited contact with issue foodstuffs in general, but do IMP’s still exist? Certainly in the Cadets, I’ve only seen MRE’s. Now I understand that MRE’s are ubiquitous and cheap, but can IMP’s still be had? Are they soldier-only?

Meals Rejected by Everyone actually can be pretty tasty, but their aftereffects are sub-optimal. Are IMP’s any different?
Worth noting the CCO-issue MREs are a very stripped-down selection from the US menu. I'd be incredibly happy with cadets returning to the former situation with IMPs: a reliable disposal solution for near-expiry meals.

 

tomahawk6

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Back in the day C rats gave me the runs so all I ate was the peanut butter spread/crackers and the dessert. I loved the LRP rations which were dehydrated just add hot water a rare treat.
 

MJP

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As I said, limited contact for me. Why the most expensive?

Compared to fresh meals they are an extremely expensive option. The cost for one IMP is roughly equivariant to what it costs to feed one soldier all three meals in the field.

That said most end-users units never see that cost attributed to them though as IMPs are bought using national funds and allocated to L1s. However if you go to the field and set up your kitchen or bring in hayboxes from the base kitchen that hits yours budget directly so it is an attractive option for units. Plus IMPs allow for training to carry on without that pesky need to plan for fresh meals.
 

MilEME09

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last a checked IMP's were over a hundred a case, but that was some time ago, and thats for 10 IMP's, times that by three meals per day, and say a thousand troops on an EX. it adds up very quickly. Cost also varies depending if its a case of breakfast, lunch or dinner. Think of it this way the IMP you are paying for a commerial food facility to prep, cook, cool, vacuum seal, package and ship these meals. A flying kitchen you pay food the food and your own cooks the rest, your only additional cost you are not already incurring is the food, you are paying for fuel, and pay regardless.
 

GAP

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MRE's were just coming in the fore during my time. They were fabulous after the C rats we normally consumed, dated 1943.....and this was in 1967-68....still, tasted ok except for the ham and lima beans. :giggle:
 

Blackadder1916

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A long time ago, in a land far, far away . . . IMPs were the luxury; MREs were what we received. Apparently it was cheaper and easier for 4 CMBG to draw hard rations from the US supply system than to maintain our own stockpile. On the final two FALLEX before the brigade closed down, the use of MREs was so low that they designated specific days for their consumption. Even then, I can't remember eating even one. Our KO, a cook of infinite talent, would always prepare "soup" on those days as a "supplement" (a supplement to hard rats was permitted, you just couldn't prepare a fresh meal). My favourite "soup" was his goulash - better than probably any gasthof. I don't know what other units did, I imagine that establishments in the villages were well visited during those days. Even with enforced consumption of MREs, the brigade's stock seemed to be hard to get rid of. During OP ASSIST (the Canadian participation in PROVIDE COMFORT to Kurdish refugees), CFE tried to get rid of a stock of approaching end of expiry date MREs without success.
 

Kat Stevens

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A long time ago, in a land far, far away . . . IMPs were the luxury; MREs were what we received. Apparently it was cheaper and easier for 4 CMBG to draw hard rations from the US supply system than to maintain our own stockpile. On the final two FALLEX before the brigade closed down, the use of MREs was so low that they designated specific days for their consumption. Even then, I can't remember eating even one. Our KO, a cook of infinite talent, would always prepare "soup" on those days as a "supplement" (a supplement to hard rats was permitted, you just couldn't prepare a fresh meal). My favourite "soup" was his goulash - better than probably any gasthof. I don't know what other units did, I imagine that establishments in the villages were well visited during those days. Even with enforced consumption of MREs, the brigade's stock seemed to be hard to get rid of. During OP ASSIST (the Canadian participation in PROVIDE COMFORT to Kurdish refugees), CFE tried to get rid of a stock of approaching end of expiry date MREs without success.
As long as there was an EDEKA or an Aldi nearbye, MREs stayed in the truck where they belonged.
 

LittleBlackDevil

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Meals Rejected by Everyone actually can be pretty tasty, but their aftereffects are sub-optimal. Are IMP’s any different?

I consumed many many IMPs back during the phase training at CFB Gagetown 1999-2001.

I have been introduced to MREs since starting with cadets.

Frankly, I don't see much difference at all between them. I have found them to be similar quality flavour-wise, and the "after effects" are similar with each albeit the MRE after effects seemed to kick in faster (i.e. after only one day of eating them, versus with the IMPs it would be several days before you really started feeling the impact).

Maybe it was because we generally had to eat them cold due to lack of time, maybe it was because 90% of the IMPs we got were either "ham steak and pineapple" or "Hungarian Goulash", but I was never impressed at all with IMPs whereas I've found MREs to be very palatable.
 

Colin Parkinson

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A long time ago, in a land far, far away . . . IMPs were the luxury; MREs were what we received. Apparently it was cheaper and easier for 4 CMBG to draw hard rations from the US supply system than to maintain our own stockpile. On the final two FALLEX before the brigade closed down, the use of MREs was so low that they designated specific days for their consumption. Even then, I can't remember eating even one. Our KO, a cook of infinite talent, would always prepare "soup" on those days as a "supplement" (a supplement to hard rats was permitted, you just couldn't prepare a fresh meal). My favourite "soup" was his goulash - better than probably any gasthof. I don't know what other units did, I imagine that establishments in the villages were well visited during those days. Even with enforced consumption of MREs, the brigade's stock seemed to be hard to get rid of. During OP ASSIST (the Canadian participation in PROVIDE COMFORT to Kurdish refugees), CFE tried to get rid of a stock of approaching end of expiry date MREs without success.
We were trading our US MRE's to the German kids for their dad's beer. I think they just wanted the Hershey bar! We also pooled our monies to get fresh food from the local gasthof.

I remember IRP's and canned bacon, yummy warm, not so much cold though. Our IMP's were pretty damm good and did not have any complaints about them. I also fondly remember our Flying Kitchens and watched the amazement on the faces of Brit Squaddies working with us, when they got to eat our food, both from quality and quantity.
 

Fishbone Jones

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I don't remember when or where I heard it, but it was awhile ago. I think IMPs cost $32.00/ meal. Might be wrong though.
 

MJP

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I don't remember when or where I heard it, but it was awhile ago. I think IMPs cost $32.00/ meal. Might be wrong though.
I have heard that before as well. Looking at this presser and doing some very rough math using the top end of the 5 year contract it looks like each meal is roughly $9-10 or roughly $30 a day which is very expensive (but needed at times).
 

Colin Parkinson

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Try to build similar 3 daily meals from commercially available sources and you likley go over that.
 
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