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Anterior chronic compartment syndrome

camnorth

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Hi all, this is my first post, I have been a lurker for a while. I am also new to the CF as I am completing my BMQ for the Reserves with the 7th Toronto Regiment.

I am looking for some advice as I have not yet graduated BMQ, but have been diagnosed with a condition that can potentially seriously impact my career. I have always had this condition although was not informed about it and dismissed it as sore muscles and such. It has become really bad due to the issued footwear and the ruckmarches and increased running PT.
I have started physio this week and have all doc's notes. Originally I presented the CO with a note from my chiropractor stating I have shin splints and to lay off for a week. Now armed with this new information I must talk to the CO.
Any one have advice or thoughts on the subject? If I should be re-coursed to deal with this problem before it gets worse or what to do? It has caused a great deal of stress....
Thanks in advance!
 

PuckChaser

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I doubt you're going right to the CO with your doctor's note.... inform your staff of your limitations. They will attempt to work with you to complete the course requirements. If your limitations are extended, you may be recoursed after you've had some time to heal. Your course staff has seen people with injuries before, unfortunately they are common with the CF due to the nature of our employment. Concentrate on your chiropractor's advice and work on getting yourself healed up. The chips will fall where they may, you can't change the past.
 

The_Falcon

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You sure you have anterior chronic compartment syndrome in your calves and not posterior (ie back of the legs)?  I was diagnosed with posterior (although sometimes if the pain got really bad I would feel it on the anterior side), compartment syndrome many years ago, while on pre-training for Astan in 2004, a few things:

1)  You need to have  a pressure test performed to fully confirm you have the condition, the military sent me (and they send lots of people for the same problem) to Toronto SEMI, to get this done, as your on reserve BMQ, you will probably need a referal from your family doctor.  Basically they make you run/walk until you feel pain, keep you going for about 10-15, let your legs rest, and then jam a specialized needle into your leg to measure the pressure.  Once you have a solid diagnosis, then the doc there will let you know your treatment options.  My condition had gotten to the point I required surgery.  Until you get the needle test, your chiropractor/fam doc etc. will just be guessing at how serious your problem is.

2)Worst case you need surgery, it's not a big deal, many many people in the CF have this issue (bad genetics, bad foot wear etc.), I was on crutches for like 2-3 days once I was discharged from the hospital, walking around slowly but surely in a week and a half, almost fully recovered after a month.  That was my experience.  It depends on the surgeon and how they go about releasing the compartment, and of course you.  After surgery, I could run with no issues, and when rucking the first 1-2 kms would be uncomfortable, but once things stretched out a bit it was fine. 

Edit to add link
http://www.semisportmed.com/leg-pain-in-runners-p136040
 

camnorth

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Hi, thank you to both Puckchaser and Hatchet Man for the replies, it helps a great deal. My condition was diagnosed through a workup of my past condition and history with a hands on approach as well, I have not had a pressure test done. Luckily I am seeing my doc today so I will ask about a refferal for the pressure test. I am thinking it might be a good option to comlete the course after I've had everything diagnosed and finished treatment/surgery, because it is a real bummer to be the only one on the course sitting out of activities  :(.
Thanks everyone
 

The_Falcon

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PuckChaser said:
Your course staff has seen people with injuries before, unfortunately they are common with the CF due to the nature of our employment.

Unfortunately from my own personal experiences, and from working on courses, very few instructors know what chronic compartment syndrome is.  The Med Staff in Meaford are well versed (or were in 2004, as the PA and MO, were the ones who figured out my problem and sent me to SEMI).  Most people equate leg pain to weakness and/or shin splints. 
 

camnorth

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Hatchet Man- I really appreciate your input and advice, I realize not a lot of people understand what chronic compartment syndrome is, I'm hoping to explain to the 2 i/c and have them understand that I may need to be recoursed or something so I can take care of this, my feet are also in rough shape, I have bad plantar fascitis so I'm having custom orthotics made, hoping all of this will sort itself out. It is definitely not due to "weakness" or anything macho silly like that, just faulty biomechanics, poor footwear and strain throughout life, unfortunately that's what I have to deal with.
Thanks again!
 

Cdnleaf

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camnorth said:
Hatchet Man- I really appreciate your input and advice, I realize not a lot of people understand what chronic compartment syndrome is, I'm hoping to explain to the 2 i/c and have them understand that I may need to be recoursed or something so I can take care of this, my feet are also in rough shape, I have bad plantar fascitis so I'm having custom orthotics made, hoping all of this will sort itself out. It is definitely not due to "weakness" or anything macho silly like that, just faulty biomechanics, poor footwear and strain throughout life, unfortunately that's what I have to deal with.
Thanks again!

I think you would be pleasantly surprised at what people understand after running around most of their career in Mark 3s :).  18 years ago I had a fasciotomy at the old NDMC to repair anterior compartment syndrome, unfortunately acute traumatic.  Good luck with your situation and my  :2c: is let the medical system to educate your 2IC by way of employment limitations, focus on recovery and the way ahead. All the best.

Couple of links.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2941579

http://www.wheelessonline.com/ortho/compartment_syndrome

 

OldSolduer

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Now that we have kind of sorted this out, would someone please tell me what this affliction is?
 

The_Falcon

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Jim Seggie said:
Now that we have kind of sorted this out, would someone please tell me what this affliction is?

The links give good descriptions, but basically what it feels like when you start running/rucking, is like some jerk pumping up your calves (calves are usually what are afflicted when it's chronic or extertional compartment syndrome), to the point where it feels like they are going to burst.  This is obviously quite painful.  Alot of people (myself included) sometimes mistake this condition for shin splints, usually because when the muscle starts to swells, it basically starts tugging on the attachment points on the shin bone. 
 
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