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All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)

daftandbarmy

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...and yet your arrival on this site has been a long litany of things wrong with Canada, Canadian society, Canadian Public Servants, Canadian Military, obese Canadians, etc. You wax for the equality with which citizens were treated in your country of birth, and talk about the softness and entitlement of Canadians, especially public servants, and how industry is so much nobler, and yet you also seem driven to leave a senior IT position in industry to join an organization that you say represents the less desirable entitled part of society.

You’re all over the place, taking significant liberty with context of facts and espousing linkages that don’t exist, then snapping back when people call you in precisely the things you have said as well
as implied. Play the misunderstood victim of our contextual ignorance as you wish, but don’t be surprised when people continue to call you on factual or logical leaps that have little basis in reality.

$0.02
Meme Reaction GIF by Robert E Blackmon
 

lenaitch

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Long as I don't have to haul their bariatric asses up and down stairs, I don't care. Let them eat cake! :)

Ed Koch, mayor of New York during the debate whether females should become firefighters:

“I don’t care what sex a firefighter is, as long as they can carry a 200 pound mayor out of a burning building.”

(not bariatric, but still a good quote)
 

HiTechComms

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...and yet your arrival on this site has been a long litany of things wrong with Canada, Canadian society, Canadian Public Servants, Canadian Military, obese Canadians, etc. You wax for the equality with which citizens were treated in your country of birth, and talk about the softness and entitlement of Canadians, especially public servants, and how industry is so much nobler, and yet you also seem driven to leave a senior IT position in industry to join an organization that you say represents the less desirable entitled part of society.

You’re all over the place, taking significant liberty with context of facts and espousing linkages that don’t exist, then snapping back when people call you in precisely the things you have said as well
as implied. Play the misunderstood victim of our contextual ignorance as you wish, but don’t be surprised when people continue to call you on factual or logical leaps that have little basis in reality.

$0.02
Fair enough as that is your opinion and observation, again I am point out my observations. I am an outsider and a foreigner and I am first gen immigrant, yes I do have a Canadian Citizenship but that doesn't mean it makes me a "Canadian" what ever that even means. I am very careful with my wording about my identity. It seems that everyone really takes things personally. I am from a culture that is direct and blunt.

What you are projecting onto me is the same thing you are guilty off. No where did I say industry is better of anything, in fact I have been very critical of the private sector in many of my posts. I am a skeptic of all things, one thing I will give credit to private sector is that with out it everyone on the public side would be unemployed, they pay the taxes they generate the wealth. Unfortunatley I have seen the massive job fall out since its my team that processes firings.

I am a driven person and I am senior in my position but what does that have anything to do with joining the military. No where did I say military is less desirable and if you looked into the posts I have made I am pro military. You are assuming my motivation of wanting to join. Maybe I want "cushy public side" pension everyone keeps talking about, or maybe I want to do as least as possible cause I am tired of working hard and I see an opportunity to disconnect :p Or Maybe I just want to do something very different?

May I ask the question of why you chose to leave if you have left the military?
May I ask why are you so critical of the "industry" or private sector?
May I ask why you put everything on the public sector on a worship pedestal?

The freedom of expression cannot exist with out the freedom to offend.
Just because I disagree with you that doesn't make me a bad guy nor does it make me a good guy because I agree with you.
People take things far to personally. You know sometimes things are just what they are and that's all they are.

As for conclusions and leaps.. What exactly did I misrepresent,
  1. Obesity is a problem,
  2. Majority of covid related Deaths have obesity in common
  3. Majority of Deaths are amongst the Weak, old and frail.
  4. Most deaths are in LTC's
  5. Who gets to determine who is essential and who is not and why?
  6. WHO is a bunch of clowns
  7. Politicians keep changing the goal posts (PCR testing cycles, flattening curve, prevent sickness, don't kill grandma, quarntine camps, narratives keep changing)
  8. Covid is not a hoax but its greatly exaturated in its scope and deadliness
  9. Rights and freedoms keep getting curtailed for exactly what? Is this ever going to stop?
  10. We are 14 days of flattening the curve a year in. I could even see my dying grandmother because I cannot travel, I wear a mask, I socially distance. I am doing my part, WTF else does the system want.
  11. No one is having an honest conversation about COVID societal costs, because that is somehow forbidden speech.
shrug
Maybe I am bored and frustrated and its nice to talk to people in a civil manner with out a shouting match and name calling?
 

mariomike

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Ed Koch, mayor of New York during the debate whether females should become firefighters:

“I don’t care what sex a firefighter is, as long as they can carry a 200 pound mayor out of a burning building.”

(not bariatric, but still a good quote)
I think the Mayor famously said that in the early 1980's.

Even by 9/11, of the 11,000 members in the FDNY, about 25 were female.

As far as Covid vaccinations in 2021 are concerned, I read an interesting article,

Why can’t NYC vaccinate like it’s 1947?​

New York City gave smallpox vaccines to 5 million residents in just two weeks 74 years ago. What have we unlearned?

I read that the advantage health officials had after WW2 was that people trusted their government more back then. More than they do now.
 

Blackadder1916

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Why can’t NYC vaccinate like it’s 1947?​

New York City gave smallpox vaccines to 5 million residents in just two weeks 74 years ago. What have we unlearned?

I read that the advantage health officials had after WW2 was that people trusted their government more back then. More than they do now.

1947 NYC Public Health Department Smallpox Vaccination Clinic

1947.jpg New-Yorkers-Line-Up-By-The-Thousands-Waiting-To-Be-Vaccinated-At-The-Department-Of-Health-Duri...jpg

2021 NYC Javits Center Covid Vaccination location

2021.jpg 2021Javits.jpg

Trust? Yeah, that may be a component, but logistics may also play a part. Firstly, the availability of a vaccine; secondly, the availability of qualified staff. But even if both of those requirements are met as well as appropriate locations, what would it take to accomplish 5 million vaccinations in just two weeks? The 1947 photo reminds me, somewhat, of the needle parades at Cornwallis in the 1970s and, to an extent, Chilliwack in the 1980s. The 2021 photo, (in terms of spacing, staffing and procedures) is more like an enlarged (greatly enlarged) version of the vaccination clinic I was at last April (updating some of the routine ones as well as those that the over-65 crowd get). I've done needle parades (in the "old" days) that gave jabs to hundreds in the space of an hour or two; if modern protocols were used those numbers would probably be at best 20% (if that) of the throughput.
 

mariomike

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1947 NYC Public Health Department Smallpox Vaccination Clinic



2021 NYC Javits Center Covid Vaccination location



Trust? Yeah, that may be a component, but logistics may also play a part. Firstly, the availability of a vaccine; secondly, the availability of qualified staff. But even if both of those requirements are met as well as appropriate locations, what would it take to accomplish 5 million vaccinations in just two weeks? The 1947 photo reminds me, somewhat, of the needle parades at Cornwallis in the 1970s and, to an extent, Chilliwack in the 1980s. The 2021 photo, (in terms of spacing, staffing and procedures) is more like an enlarged (greatly enlarged) version of the vaccination clinic I was at last April (updating some of the routine ones as well as those that the over-65 crowd get). I've done needle parades (in the "old" days) that gave jabs to hundreds in the space of an hour or two; if modern protocols were used those numbers would probably be at best 20% (if that) of the throughput.
On January 3, 2021, Dr. Anthony Fauci described his own experience in the 1947 smallpox outbreak, in specifying the potential speed of the U.S. national COVID-19 vaccination program . Fauci stated, "New York City, in March and April of 1947, vaccinated 6,350,000 people; 5 million of which they did in two weeks. I was a six-year-old boy who was one of those who got vaccinated. So if New York City can do 5 million in two weeks, the United States could do a million a day. We can do it."

The rapid response was credited with limiting the outbreak to only two deaths.

Almost 470,000 Americans have died from the coronavirus so far, with the number widely expected to go above half a million in the next few weeks.
 

CBH99

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Trust? Yeah, that may be a component, but logistics may also play a part. Firstly, the availability of a vaccine; secondly, the availability of qualified staff.
Is finding qualified staff going to be that hard for us though? I would imagine there are more than enough nurses (RN and LPN), doctors, and other folks in the medical world that are qualified to give injections.

I've done needle parades (in the "old" days) that gave jabs to hundreds in the space of an hour or two; if modern protocols were used those numbers would probably be at best 20% (if that) of the throughput.
What modern protocols are you referring to, that would reduce that throughout so drastically?
 

mariomike

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Is finding qualified staff going to be that hard for us though?
It was a one-hour in-service for us stabbing our partners ( with pleasure! :) ).

I would imagine there are more than enough nurses (RN and LPN), doctors, and other folks in the medical world that are qualified to give injections.

Retired Metro members have been contacted if they wish to volunteer ( paid ) for Sioux Lookout, Timmins, and Thunder Bay. Flying in and out of the various communities each day, starting with the James Bay coast ... smallest to largest.

One week rotations and work 14-hour days.
 

kratz

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Is finding qualified staff going to be that hard for us though?

At one of our meetings here, the topic of vaccinations came up and the doctors present agreed that apes could be trained within 20 minutes to administer these shots.

The hold back is not with qualified staff, but modern perceptions, expectations and in large part the medical system protecting itself.
 

mariomike

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At one of our meetings here, the topic of vaccinations came up and the doctors present agreed that apes could be trained within 20 minutes to administer these shots.
They trained me to do it. They can train anybody. :)

Not bad money for something "an ape can be trained to do."


"This is just to deliver immunizations.”
 

Weinie

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At one of our meetings here, the topic of vaccinations came up and the doctors present agreed that apes could be trained within 20 minutes to administer these shots.

The hold back is not with qualified staff, but modern perceptions, expectations and in large part the medical system protecting itself.
Can I get an orangutan, and after he gives me the shot, I pretend shoot him and he falls down. I realize this may take more than 20 minutes of training.
 

Cdn Blackshirt

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Smallpox had a mortality rate of 30%... that's a pretty big motivator compared to ~1.5%...
It's a small fraction of that amount of you're under 65 with no comorbidities. I've seen estimates from people much smarter than me that survival rates are 99.985% in that larger population group. So basically you're looking at lightning strike or shark attack like probabilities. The issue in that at-risk demographic (which includes my parents which is why I started reading on the subject) appears to be that COVID, although entering the body through the respiratory system, actually attacks the vascular system (in particular the lining of the blood vessels). That's why you have so many problems with people with pre-existing heart disease and diabetes (and also explains some the odder symptoms like "COVID toes"). Of note, survival rates appear to be increasing as the third world in particular is becoming more active with interventions, as opposed to the prior lunacy of sending people home with no treatment of any sort (not even Vitamin C or D) to get to full viral load and impaired oxygen levels prior to them having to rush back to an emergency room. If anyone is curious, there's a handle on twitter by the name of COVID19Crusher who posts links to treatment trials from around the world which has been a fascinating read over the last several months, as he posts outcomes whether good or bad. The most recent area where doctors appear to be aligning is a drug called Ivermectin, which of observational analysis proves out, really is a silver bullet. There's also an old asthma drug (Budesonide) which the University of Oxford in England has just announced some very positive results with (Hospitalization rates cut by 90%). The best part being that unlike the vaccine candidates (which are all undergoing their stage 3 trials in the general public which frankly scares the hell out of me), it will work on all mutations, while the vaccine candidates so far appear to be more affective against some mutations but not others. Fingers crossed as we're definitely all due for some good news out of all of this.
 

daftandbarmy

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I'm probably one of those who are enjoying the lack of business travel....

What Covid-19 Has Done to Our Well-Being, in 12 Charts​

The pandemic has led to mental health declines, increased work demands, and feelings of loneliness. But the news isn’t all bad.

How has Covid-19 and the related shift to WFH affected workers? A group of researchers surveyed HBR readers and others in the fall of 2020 and found that the vast majority reported declines in both general and workplace well-being. The biggest culprits? Mental health struggles, increased job demands, and home-life challenges. A much smaller percentage reported an increase in well-being, attributing it to reduced commutes and business travel and having more time to focus on health.



https://hbr.org/2021/02/what-covid-19-has-done-to-our-well-being-in-12-charts
 

lenaitch

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At one of our meetings here, the topic of vaccinations came up and the doctors present agreed that apes could be trained within 20 minutes to administer these shots.

The hold back is not with qualified staff, but modern perceptions, expectations and in large part the medical system protecting itself.

It really isn't rocket surgery. I've done on horses lots of times - and they can kick and bite if displeased. There would have to be a nurse or other medical professional for potential adverse reactions, but the ratios of nurses to stabbers could be quite large and really move the effort along.

It's a small fraction of that amount of you're under 65 with no comorbidities. I've seen estimates from people much smarter than me that survival rates are 99.985% in that larger population group. So basically you're looking at lightning strike or shark attack like probabilities. The issue in that at-risk demographic (which includes my parents which is why I started reading on the subject) appears to be that COVID, although entering the body through the respiratory system, actually attacks the vascular system (in particular the lining of the blood vessels). That's why you have so many problems with people with pre-existing heart disease and diabetes (and also explains some the odder symptoms like "COVID toes"). Of note, survival rates appear to be increasing as the third world in particular is becoming more active with interventions, as opposed to the prior lunacy of sending people home with no treatment of any sort (not even Vitamin C or D) to get to full viral load and impaired oxygen levels prior to them having to rush back to an emergency room. If anyone is curious, there's a handle on twitter by the name of COVID19Crusher who posts links to treatment trials from around the world which has been a fascinating read over the last several months, as he posts outcomes whether good or bad. The most recent area where doctors appear to be aligning is a drug called Ivermectin, which of observational analysis proves out, really is a silver bullet. There's also an old asthma drug (Budesonide) which the University of Oxford in England has just announced some very positive results with (Hospitalization rates cut by 90%). The best part being that unlike the vaccine candidates (which are all undergoing their stage 3 trials in the general public which frankly scares the hell out of me), it will work on all mutations, while the vaccine candidates so far appear to be more affective against some mutations but not others. Fingers crossed as we're definitely all due for some good news out of all of this.

Anything I have read doesn't show Ivermectin as a silver bullet for Covid; rather, the medical jury is still out and waiting for further research. Maybe we read different things.
I'm probably one of those who are enjoying the lack of business travel....

What Covid-19 Has Done to Our Well-Being, in 12 Charts​

The pandemic has led to mental health declines, increased work demands, and feelings of loneliness. But the news isn’t all bad.

How has Covid-19 and the related shift to WFH affected workers? A group of researchers surveyed HBR readers and others in the fall of 2020 and found that the vast majority reported declines in both general and workplace well-being. The biggest culprits? Mental health struggles, increased job demands, and home-life challenges. A much smaller percentage reported an increase in well-being, attributing it to reduced commutes and business travel and having more time to focus on health.



https://hbr.org/2021/02/what-covid-19-has-done-to-our-well-being-in-12-charts
I have yet to be convinced that the WFH trend will continue in any significant way. Much depends on a number of factors, including type of work and personality. Our S-in-L is an IT manager has embraced it, only going into work when absolutely necessary. Out daughter, less so. She is in a public-facing profession and started out with great gusto catching up on dormant projects but enthusiasm waned.

Anecdotally, I have heard about people who thought that moving to their cottage would be great, until they are staring out at a dark lake in the middle of winter, a jug of milk is an hour away and the hydro and internet is dodgy. It's perhaps one thing to shift some employees the WFH, but I'm not sure there is much experience with integrating new hires into the corporate culture.

Some zealots are even saying that Toronto and the government should scrap all their expensive transit expansion plans because they won't be needed. I don't think they're there yet.
 
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